My inherited glandular formula…

But first…
Dulltown, Europe: Today’s dictionary words are: asseverate, assart, asphodel, assignat, assuefaction, and brool. Please have these words looked up and placed in suitable sentences ready for Professor Mouldie first thing after breakfast tomorrow morning. As tomorrow is a Tuesday the professor will be speaking only in Icelandic.
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Oh, it seems ages since we dived into the pages of that strange junk shop book Looking at Faces and Remembering Them, A Guide to Facial Identification (1971) by Jacques Penry, Facial Topographer and inventor of the Penry Identification Technique (Photo-Fit). I think this book must have sold in vast numbers to police forces all over the world.

DSCN3661Perhaps today we should see what Jacques has to say about facial outlines, let’s turn to page 23. By the way he illustrates the book with his own drawings, nice aren’t they?

WP F DSCN3663The structure of the face and the pattern of the personality are together governed from conception (via the genes) by one or another kind of inherited glandular formula. For instance, if the adrenals (controlling directed force and a ‘harder’ cast of features) are paramount in their influence, an angular mould of face results. If the thyroid exerts a strong overall influence (determining a softer cast of face and nature) a generally rounded shape of face is manifest. Because these two main type-groups, Angular and Rounded, are diametrically opposite in shape (as they are in basic personality) they are easy to differentiate; neither could possibly be mistaken for the other. In a very general way, therefore, regardless of sex, nationality or colour, most faces may be grouped into one or other of these two main categories. (See Fig. 6)

An afterthought:
I’ve had this book a few years, and only just now did it occur to me that Jacques might have done a ‘photo-fit’ of his own face for his book cover… What do you think? (Jacques Penry)

About Dave Whatt

Grumpy old surrealist artist, musician, postcard maker, bluesman, theatre set designer, and debonair man-about-town. My favourite tools are the plectrum and the pencil...
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