Hell!… What’s all that bellowing and mooing coming from upstairs?…

But first…
Dulltown, UK: Today’s architectural term is Prothesis : In Byzantine architecture, a room in the church serving for the preparation and storage of the species of the Eucharist before Mass.
Apart from it being a room, I have no idea what that means…
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dscn4383Yes, I know one is not allowed to take photographs in the art gallery… see, there is a notice over there, by the door, which states that very clearly…
Oh, but look at this mad juxtaposition, how could I possibly resist? The little running skeleton in his glass case – you can see his ghostly reflection in the glass too, and the cows and bulls startled by him are going absolutely ape and are trying to stampede out of their frame, thnder across the polished wooden floor, past the frozen wide-eyed, open-mouthed, customers in the gallery cafe, down two curving flights of stairs, and out through the glass doors into the street…
No, I couldn’t resist. If someone from the gallery doesn’t like it, and they bother to get in touch to complain, I will I think, delete this post…
So, make the most of this image while it is still available dear reader…

About Dave Whatt

Grumpy old surrealist artist, musician, postcard maker, bluesman, theatre set designer, and debonair man-about-town. My favourite tools are the plectrum and the pencil...
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12 Responses to Hell!… What’s all that bellowing and mooing coming from upstairs?…

  1. Jheron Bash says:

    So, which art gallery was this, Dave? I think we should be told.

  2. Jheron Bash says:

    I hear Beverley’s a nice little town …..

  3. Well…what a strange scene indeed. I do like the little skeleton….is it a lizard? Those cows have taken something that doesn’t agree with them, I’m sure. Unless its the impending storm. And I daren’t take any photos…..our galleries up here have cctv as well as stern faced guards positively daring you to do anything but rub your chin thoughtfully while gazing in earnest at such works of art. 🙂

    • Dave Whatt says:

      The painting is called “A Panic” – I rather like it – for me it could have been even bigger!
      The skeleton: it does look a bit lizard-like doesn’t it? The rest of the room was full of such things – I don’t know it it was a trendy ‘modern’ piece of ‘art’ or just a show of some old bones they’d had in the basement for years…

  4. Dana Doran says:

    Oh museums and their rules! (I actually paid to take a university course on museums and their creation/operation) Briefly, the collection is privately owned but maintained by donations from the (unwitting) public when they visit. In Seattle, for instance, the saavy art professor will note that “donations” at the Seattle Art Museum are just that, voluntary donations…while it looks as though you need to pay to enter – you do not, unless there is a traveling exhibit which requires a special ticket. The NO PHOTOGRAPHY doesn’t apply to the permanent collection, but does apply to the traveling exhibit – so put your cameras away, and by the way, NO SKETCHING! No sketching? Yes, I asked why…..no pencils and pens are permitted because someone might try to deface the work…..haha I laughed. I was inside the special exhibit, looking around at all the esteemed art and surmised that no one, not even the curator, would be able to tell if the work had been “defaced.” And why no photography?? It was a rule instituted by the loaning museum apparently to maintain the exclusivity of the collection…..or to sell the accompanying book – available at the gift shop.

    • Dave Whatt says:

      I recall years ago going into galleries and seeing somebody sitting with an easel set up in front of a great work , and there was a nice smell of oil paint and turpentine hanging in the air – you could walk up, look over their shoulder, and point out where they were going wrong – only kidding!
      But yes, at the entrance to the big galleries the word ‘voluntary’ is always printed rather small…

  5. Great post, don’t delete, fight back! Strangely I was able to photograph at will at the R A Summer Show this year and it made it much more enjoyable. Your use of the word juxtaposition here is just about acceptable.

    • Dave Whatt says:

      It’s my favourite word! Ho ho!…
      Yes, I think it’s great to be able to photograph the work in galleries – after all if you can see it you should be able to take a photo to take home with you…

  6. ktz2 says:

    Looking at this large painting made me recall some other large, very large, old paintings I saw in the Louvre a long time ago, but the type could be in any European art musuem.By large I mean around 6’x 5′ or maybe larger.
    They were telling condensed stories. One that I remember had farmers in their fields, and people gathered elsewhere while a big shot like a king or duke or whatever, in full fancy uniform, rode in on a big horse–there were peasants getting trampled by the horse, there was blood, and in the distance a fire was blazing. Things were rough back then!

    • Dave Whatt says:

      Hm, not as rough as they are now Kate… No, no, sorry, I’m being far too negative…
      I like paintings like that – it’s probably Victorian isn’t it?
      Their subjects were a bit cute and sentimental sometimes, but hell, those lads and lasses could paint!… Even the ones you’ve never heard of…

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