The old oak chair by the window…

But first…
Dulltown, UK: Today’s dictionary words are: araeometer, appulse, apterous, Aquifoliaceae, aragonite, and vetiver. Please have these words looked up and placed in suitable sentences ready for Professor Mouldie first thing after breakfast tomorrow morning. The professor will be conducting the lesson using only Pig Latin – you will be expected to keep up and respond in kind. (PL)
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Well, I suppose that’s what comes from having a nice old chair in front of your Venetian blinds…
Another picture from last year – this one from May – see, now I’m only a year behind in showing you them!
As you can see from the green wall (which I think I mentioned a couple of days ago) we are again in my living room. As I walked past the window I noticed how the upright slats on the back of the chair…* are they called ‘slats’? You couldn’t really called them ‘spindles’ could you? There are not round, that is ‘spun’ on a lathe, they are rectangular in section, perhaps they are ‘slats’, or possibly ‘spells’? I’m sure I’ve heard ‘spell’ used in furniture and woodworking nomenclature – what a great word is ‘nomenclature’ – I wanted to put that in, even if it’s wrong… I’ve started babbling haven’t I?… Oh, I just Googled ‘spell’ in regards to chairs and woodwork – and got nothing… Hm… Perhaps it is a local Dulltown word from my childhood? Ah, I just tried again with Google and found that ‘spell’ can be a ‘splinter of wood’ – perhaps a painful one that you accidentally stick in your finger?… And of course you get magic spells too – I don’t think these are magic ones though…
Anyway back to the photo – where was I?…
Ah yes, *…the upright slats on the back of the chair have obviously been scheming with the horizontal slats of the Venetian blinds to form an attractive grid pattern in light and shadow on the seat.
Gosh, I thought, that looks almost good enough for a photograph!…

It is a nice chair isn’t it? I’ve had it for years – it’s not an expensive thing, probably from a junk shop – these were probably made in their thousands in factories many years ago and shipped to dreary offices all over the world. All good solid oak of course – oak always looks good when it gets old and a bit battered – just look at church pews with their lovely ancient hand-worn finials!
I keep seeing this chair’s relatives on TV – especially in American courtroom dramas – the jury usually sits on a dozen of these – and you often see a very overweight sweaty sheriff or deputy, wearing a big hat, and perhaps chewing tobacco, lolling on one in some seedy small town USA police station…

Not a brilliant photograph, but better seen than discarded I think…

About Dave Whatt

Grumpy old surrealist artist, musician, postcard maker, bluesman, theatre set designer, and debonair man-about-town. My favourite tools are the plectrum and the pencil...
This entry was posted in archeology, colours, composition, cool, creation, history, information, observations, photography, seeing, serendipity, style, words and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to The old oak chair by the window…

  1. Sharon Mann says:

    Chairs just aren’t made like they used to be…you snapped this picture at the right moment.

  2. ktz2 says:

    oooh ! very dramatic

  3. Dana Doran says:

    Hum. I wonder, if when you’re all caught up sharing your photos, will you share the prints from the future?

  4. Oh that’s a lovely atmospheric shot 🙂

  5. Rebecca says:

    Erm, just realised my other comment is in the wrong place, what a shocking breach of etiquette. How embarrassing!

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