The lino printing saga finally concludes…

But first…
Dulltown, UK/Europe: Today’s elephant in the room is the one just finishing off three whole boxes of Pringles.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Yes, that lino print has finally been done!
If you don’t know what I’m talking about dear reader, let me explain. It all started about ten days ago when I was musing about the borders that I always put around my images to stop them from escaping into the surrounding world of unforgiving white, yes, I am trying to add interest by being deliberately obscure and wordy. (first post) A design for a new lino print came out of this musing, one where I would mess about a bit with the idea of borders and consider what their purpose is. (second post) Having come up with a suitable, and by then improved, image to illustrate my thoughts, and still not being sure if it was any good or not, I showed you the cutting of the lino on my scruffy bench. (third post)

Alright, it’s done. I’ve printed an edition of ten, about A4 size, in oil-based black ink on nice thin Japanese Kizuki paper, plus a spare one, an ‘artist’s proof’ to keep for myself.
Ha! As if people would be flocking to buy the others!
So, here, dear reader, it is… at last:

I’m not even sure, now that it’s done, that I actually like it.
It is rather odd, isn’t it? But then if you call yourself a surrealist, as I do, the odder the better I suppose. Do you think there might be a well-hidden ‘meaning’ in there?
From a few feet away it might be seen as face, a grumpy face – it’s that downturned miserable mouth, isn’t it? Now, here’s a question; do you see the ‘mouth’ as a flat banana shape, or do you see it in three dimensions as a hole in the ground? Same with the things to left and right above – I find it quite hard to not see them as square things with round holes in ’em.
Look out, keep your head down, here comes some anthropomorphism!
What with the ‘mouth’ and the ‘eyes’, I sort of feel a bit of warmth and empathy for the big fat round chap, covered in what might be stars, balancing there, on his finger ends, showing off – don’t you? The phrase ‘dark matter’ just popped into my head. What popped into yours?

That’s enough of all that kind of talk I think. Would you like to see a picture of these prints pegged to a piece of string drying?
No?
Hard luck, here it is:

About Dave Whatt

Grumpy old surrealist artist, musician, postcard maker, bluesman, theatre set designer, and debonair man-about-town. My favourite tools are the plectrum and the pencil...
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8 Responses to The lino printing saga finally concludes…

  1. David Manley says:

    Good work! You’ve got the balance right as indeed the chap has himself! And by the miracle of 2D its likely he can hold the pose for eternity!

  2. I see the whole thing as a face….the big roundness being the nose, and the eyes on either side. The border is the shape of the face. And now I can’t see it as anything else! No finger balancing here m’lud…

  3. Dixon Kundts says:

    I read “farce” too. But far from it. It is the so-called “real world” which is a farce. This is great.

  4. Dixon Kundts says:

    Your mind games with perceived forms in empty space reminded me of this logo which I saw hundreds of times on signs and adverts and packets of food before the penny dropped. It’s the sign of a French supermarket…
    https://mms.businesswire.com/media/20180701005068/en/360964/5/logo_sans_carrefour.jpg?download=1

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